University of Portland

Table of Contents

Tours

  1. Official Admissions Campus Visit Tour

    Can't make it to campus or want to preview or revisit your campus visit tour? This virtual tour stops at all the sites where our admissions tour guides lead visitors.

    Stops

    1. Waldschmidt Hall

      Your tour begins on the steps of Waldschmidt Hall, home to many of the University of Portland's administrative offices including the admissions office (2nd floor).

      Originally called West Hall, Waldschmidt Hall was built in 1891 for Portland University, the Methodist institution that owned the first college on The Bluff. That school closed a few years later, and West Hall and the property surrounding it were purchased for Columbia University, renamed the University of Portland in 1935.

      Over the years the building has served as a student dormitory, dining hall, classroom, and administrative offices.

      The building was remodeled and restored in 1992 and renamed Waldschmidt Hall in honor of the University’s 15th president, Bishop Paul Waldschmidt, C.S.C.

      Today the building houses the offices of the president, provost, and vice presidents of financial affairs, student affairs, University operations, and University relations; admissions; controller; development; financial aid; Graduate School; human resources; marketing and communications; payroll; registrar; and student accounts and the cashier.

    2. The Bluff

      From this point, you have a beautiful view of Mt. Hood (only 45 minutes away) and downtown Portland (10 minutes away and easily accessible by car, bike, or public transportation).

    3. Swindells Hall

      University of Portland is well-known for its strong science programs including majors in biology, chemistry, and environmental sciences as well as pre-medicine, pre-dentistry, pre-physical therapy, and pre-veterinary studies. Swindells Hall, University of Portland's 42,000-square-foot “interactive science laboratory” is home to many science classes.

       

      Named for regent George Swindells ’55 and his wife Susan, the hall opened in 1999. It has nine biology and chemistry labs, a climate-controlled growth chamber, a greenhouse, a radioisotope room, and faculty offices.

       

      Swindells Hall was built to LEED Gold standards and was a winner of the Portland BEST (Businesses for an Environmentally Sustainable Tomorrow) Award.

    4. St. Mary's Student Center

      You'll hear it over and over at UP: what you learn outside the classroom is as important as what you learn in the classroom. St. Mary's Student Center is home to the Office of Student Activities, which oversees all campus clubs and several student-run organizations that plan campus concerts, movies, lectures, dances, and other events.

      St. Mary's is also home to the student government (ASUP) offices, the student newspaper (The Beacon) and the yearbook (The Log), Campus Ministry offices, and the offices of the Moreau Center, the University's volunteer and service office.

    5. Chapel of Christ the Teacher

      The Chapel of Christ the Teacher offers Mass daily and twice on Sundays for students who wish to attend. The University of Portland is affiliated with the Congregation of Holy Cross, a Catholic order of priests and brothers. About 40 percent of the University's students identify as Catholic. Campus Ministry offers a variety of retreats and programming to help students explore their spiritual side; there are many faith-sharing groups on campus for students of other denominations as well.

    6. Bauccio Commons

      Bauccio Commons is the University of Portland's main dining hall and it offers something for everyone. There are grilled-to-orders burgers and sandwiches, salads, soups, pizza, rotating "global" dishes, and a coffee bar. Bauccio Commons is a favorite place for conversations with friends, informal meetings, and study sessions.

    7. Shiley Hall

      Shiley Hall is home to the Shiley School of Engineering, and it was completely renovated in 2009. It has 17,000 square feet dedicated to 18 different labs, extensive shop facilities, a 40-seat open computer lab and two computer classrooms, and the two-story Vollum Study Room.

      Shiley Hall is LEED Platinum certified and a winner of the Portland BEST (Businesses for an Environmentally Sustainable Tomorrow) Award.

    8. Buckley Center

      Buckley Center, often called "BC" by UP students and faculty, has been a main academic building on campus since 1969. It is home to the College of Arts & Sciences, the School of Nursing and its state-of-the-art Learning Resource Center, the Shepard Academic Resource Center, and the Office of Studies Abroad.

    9. Clark Library

      The Clark Library was built in 1959 and completely renovated in 2013. The library features

      • Seating for approximately 700 people, with a variety of individual and collaborative seating areas;
      • 19 group study rooms including nine equipped with monitors for group viewing from a laptop;
      • 50 VDI workstations with access to the library's online  resources, Microsoft Office, course software, and more;
      • A digital lab offering creative production space for developing and editing multimedia  assignments and teaching units; and
      • A quiet study floor (on the lower floor of the library)  with a cozy fireplace seating area.
    10. Franz Hall

      Franz Hall is a five-story academic center built in 1995 and named for regents Robert W. Franz and Elsie Franz Finley. Its 78,000 square feet feature 32 classrooms, 70 faculty offices and two computer labs.

      The building received a Collegiate Citation from American Schools and Universities magazine for its innovative classroom design.

      Franz Hall is home to the Dr. Robert B. Pamplin, Jr. School of Business Administration; School of Education; Garaventa Center for Catholic Intellectual Life and American Culture; the technology Help Desk; the Franz Coffee Cart; and the Bloomberg Trading Room.

    11. Mago Hunt Center

      Mago Hunt Center was built in 1973. It is named for the first wife of Bill Hunt, a late regent and long-time supporter of the University. The center has a 325-seat theater and a 150-seat recital hall. The drama department stages at least four productions in the theater each year, and in the summer Mock’s Crest Productions, a professional theater company, stages a Gilbert and Sullivan show.

    12. Orrico Hall

      Orrico Hall, named for the late regent Frank Orrico and his family, houses a health and counseling center on the top floor. Nurse practitioners are on campus weekdays to treat students with minor health problems, and counselors offer pastoral care, substance abuse prevention, and personal counseling.

      The building’s bottom floor is home to the Career Center, which helps students with job and internship searches, resume writing, and interviewing skills.

    13. Mehling Hall

      Mehling Hall, the tallest building on campus and in North Portland, houses  women in 195 rooms on its eight floors. Mehling was built in 1964 and has housed  women exclusively since its opening. The hall is named for the Rev.  Theodore J. Mehling, C.S.C., the 11th president of the University.  During Fr. Mehling's tenure, women first gained full admission to the  University.

       

      The hall has kitchens on every floor; some of the nicest and  most spacious rooms on campus; large study rooms; a ballroom; and a black box theater in the basement used for small theater productions.

    14. Villa Maria

      Villa Maria, named for the University’s patroness, the Virgin Mary, opened in 1957 as the first women’s residence hall on campus. Its location on the far Northwestern reaches of campus was chosen deliberately because the provincial superior at the time of its construction mandated that the hall be built as far away from the men’s dorm (Christie) as possible.

       

      The hall became a men’s residence in the 1980s and today houses approximately 150 men in 72 rooms. The building has a central lounge with a big screen television including  a DVD player and a VCR, a basketball court behind the building, and a  chapel. It has a computer lab, a game room, and two study rooms.

    15. Corrado Hall

      Corrado Hall is a three-story, 82-room residence hall for men and women. It was built in 1998 and named for its benefactors, Albert Corrado '55 and his  wife, Susanne.

       

      The hall boasts a chapel, floor lounges, a south portico, views of the  Willamette River, and all the amenities of a state-of-the-art residence  hall.


    16. Etzel Field

      Joe Etzel Field, previously Pilot Stadium before being renamed in the summer of 2004 in honor of former   Portland athletic director and long-time head baseball coach Joe Etzel, was  completed prior to the 1988 baseball season. The facility received  extensive upgrades during the winter of 2014, which included the installation  of the new AstroTurf field. The cutting edge synthetic turf system, along with new fencing, bullpens and a scoreboard, is part of the first  phase of a planned renovation project.

    17. Beauchamp Recreation & Wellness Center

      The Beauchamp Recreation & Wellness Center, named for the University's 19th president Rev. E. William Beauchamp, C.S.C., opens in August 2015.

      The 72,000-square-foot center includes three gyms, locker rooms, an outdoor recreation area and bike rental shop, plus a 3,670-square-foot cardio training space. In addition, the center has three wood floor studios, a suspended indoor track, a rock wall, a wellness suite and several training and workout areas.

    18. Fields Hall & Schoenfeldt Hall

      Fields and Schoenfeldt Halls, built in 2009, are two distinct halls housed in one building.

      Fields Hall is an 85-room women's residence named for Fred and Suzanne Fields, long-time benefactors of the University.

      Schoenfeldt Hall is a 79-room men's residence and is named for Rev. Arthur Schoenfeldt, C.S.C., brother of Suzanne Fields. Fr. Art was affectionately known as "Padre" around the UP campus, and residents of Schoenfeldt often refer to their hall as Padre.

      The halls share the Sacred Heart Chapel, a workout facility, and outdoor basketball and sand volleyball courts.

    19. Tyson Hall

      Tyson Hall is a coed, apartment-style student  residence for  upper-class students. There are 109 bedrooms in 20 apartments; each unit  houses groups of 4, 6, or  7 students and has full kitchen  facilities, shared bathrooms, cable TV,  and in-apartment laundry  facilities. There is carpet in living areas  and bedrooms, and linoleum  in the kitchen and bathroom.

       

      The hall is named for the University's 18th president, Rev. David Tyson, C.S.C.

       

      The building also houses the Offices of Residence Life, Mailing & Printing Services, and Information Services.

    20. Haggerty Hall

      Haggerty Hall is a coed, apartment-style student  residence for upper-class students. There are 82 bedrooms in 16 apartments; each unit houses groups of 4, 6, or  7 students and has full kitchen facilities, shared bathrooms, cable TV,  and in-apartment laundry facilities. There is carpet in living areas  and bedrooms, and linoleum in the kitchen and bathroom.

      Haggerty Hall is named for Lawrence and Mary Ellen Haggerty, parents of  Peggy Haggerty '75, a University regent who passed away in 2010.

       

      The building  also has a common area for students, as well as the St. André Bessette, C.S.C., Chapel in which a Mass is said one night each week.

    21. Lund Family Hall

      UP's newest residence hall, Lund Family Hall, opened its doors in August 2016. Each residential floor is complete with a social lounge and complemented by two study rooms on each residential wing. A large lounge on the first floor that boasts a fireplace, pool table, comfy couches and chairs, is an inviting space to gather with friends for socializing or all-hall events. A state-of-the-art community kitchen off the main lounge is a great place for making tasty treats for after-Mass socials. The courtyard outside the main entrance to the hall is a welcoming space for residents to gather when the weather is nice. You'll notice that the Lund Family Hall incorporates many design elements that we love from our existing residence halls. We look forward to the contributions this new community will make here on The Bluff!

       

      The Lund Family Hall is named for Allen and Kathleen Lund and the members of their family, many of whom are students and alumni of the University. The Lunds are longtime supporters of the University of Portland and Catholic education. Allen is a former chairman of the University of Portland’s Board of Regents and has been a member of the board since 2001. The Lunds have supported many crucial endeavors at the University, including the University's Bell Tower, the Beauchamp Recreation and Wellness Center, and an endowed scholarship for students. The naming of our newest residence hall after the Lund family honors their charitable contributions and their ongoing relationship with the University of Portland.

    22. Chiles Center

      The Chiles Center, the University’s main athletic and convocation building, opened on October 20, 1984. It is named for Earle A. and Virginia H. Chiles, parents of benefactor Earle M. Chiles.

      The building, which seats 5,000 people, is the home of Pilot basketball and volleyball teams. It has a basketball court, an indoor track, and a weight room for athletes, and the athletic offices are also located in the building.

      In addition to the athletic events, the Chiles Center hosts concerts, symposia, and the University’s annual Commencement ceremony. Visitors to the center have included Ronald Reagan (just three days after its opening), George W. Bush, the Dalai Lama, Jerry Seinfeld, and the Oregon Symphony.

    23. Clive Charles Soccer Complex

      The Clive Charles Soccer Complex includes Merlo Field, a grass practice field and the all-weather Prusynski Field (Pru Pitch). The complex, named for the Pilots' legendary coach who led the women's team to its first national championship in 2002, was built around Merlo Field in 2007 to create a premier soccer venue.

      Merlo Field, one of the premier soccer fields in the country, was dedicated in 1990. It is named for Harry A. Merlo, a benefactor and devotee of the Pilots’ soccer teams. The stadium seats 5,000 spectators, but the largest attendance ever recorded was 5,596 for a women’s soccer game vs. North Carolina on October 10, 1992. Merlo Field was the host of the women’s NCAA final four in 1994.

    24. Pilot House

      Completely remodeled in 2015, the Pilot House features a coffee bar, fireplace, couches, and cozy chairs for relaxing or studying.

      A variety of pub-style food is available from lunchtime to late in the evening or grab-and-go sandwiches, salads, healthy snacks, and drinks are available for purchase from Mack's Market.

      And on weekend nights, the Pilot House hosts Pilots After Dark, which offers music, comedy shows, and other events like trivia nights and game shows to all students for free.

      The University bookstore is located right next door. It's stocked with textbooks, UP gear, and other convenience items. 


      More about the Pilot House

      More about the bookstore

    25. Shipstad Hall

      Shipstad Hall was built in 1967 on the site of what was once a five-hole  golf course. The hall is named for the Eddie Shipstad family, one-time  owners of the Ice Follies, who were the building's primary benefactors.  Shipstad housed men for its first 20 years and then in the fall of 1987,  it became the University's first coed hall. Today, it houses men and  women in 141 rooms on four floors.

       

      Shaped somewhat like a "Z," the hall  has two large lounges with televisions, a pool table, and a piano; four  study rooms; bike storage; a chapel; a kitchen; and laundry facilities. 

    26. Kenna Hall

      Kenna Hall is a 103-room women's residence hall. Originally  called Holy Cross Hall when it opened in 1959, the building was renamed  in 1973 to honor the  University's 14th president, the Rev. Howard J.  Kenna, C.S.C.

      Today the building features the University's only sauna, as well as a pottery lab and a renovated basement lounge with pool and ping-pong tables.

    27. Christie Hall

      Christie Hall is a 62-room men's residence hall built in 1911 and remodeled in 1995.

      It is named for Archbishop Alexander Christie, the  University's founder.

      The hall features the Christie Pub (resident's game room and lounge), kitchen facilities, the Blessed Basil Moreau Chapel, and a Muslim prayer room.

    28. Dundon-Berchtold Hall

      Dundon-Berchtold Hall, the newest academic center on campus, was completed before the start of the 2019-2020 academic year. The building encompasses 65,616 square feet with 17 classrooms; 35 faculty offices; 12 informal and formal gathering spaces, including 4 conference rooms; the 146-seat Brian J. Doyle Auditorium; and the Dundon-Berchtold Institute. The building is made possible by a lead gift of $15 million from Amy Dundon-Berchtold and Jim Berchtold '63.

      The building is in the process of acquiring LEED Certification at the Silver Level. Efforts to support this level include: designing the exterior to deter bird collision; reducing water-use by 35 percent of the LEED benchmark; installing a high SRI (solar reflective index) material over 75 percent of the roof; applying interior paints that are VOC-free; and installing LED lighting with occupancy sensors throughout.

      The 17 classrooms in Dundon-Berchtold Hall have mobile instructional podiums with touch screen controls, a camera, and software to capture lectures, as well as dual drop-down screens, true color laser projection, and white boards.

      The lobby has a high-definition Planar digital touch screen with interactive video and wayfinding. The Brian J. Doyle Auditorium includes a video wall with a display area of 79 square feet, as well as options for video recording and streaming.

      The second-floor student lounge has four collaboration areas that have 50” digital displays for presentations and content sharing, and two areas use Microsoft’s Surface Hub 2S interactive display with video conferencing, screen mirroring, and digital white boarding.